Since May of this year, artist Jessica Langley has been curating public art to be displayed on her laundry line in the Ridgewood neighborhood of Queens. In her words, the venue, called Stephen and George Laundry Line, “attempts to highlight the voyeuristic aspect of living in a city. The shared backyard spaces in city blocks are sites for daily and accepted public displays of intimates accessed only by a string, but on the ground, they are more often forgotten, even forbidden places to the people who share it.”

View of Rachel Hayes work on the laundry line.

View of Rachel Hayes work on the laundry line.

The first installation featured a piece by Rachel Hayes. Her work embraces exquisite beauty, converses boldly with architectural spaces, and responds to radiant light, becoming anything from a minimalist sculpture to an abstract painting to a massive stained glass patchwork quilt. Using processes and materials based in craft and design she creates abstract compositions that embrace the language of painting while interacting with space in a sculptural/architectural manner.

Andrea Bergart - rainbowsherbert

“Rainbow Sherbert” by Andrea Bergart

In July, another Ridgewood artist, Andrea Bergart, exhibited a painting on silk called “Rainbow Sherbert”. Bergarts practice involves painting on non traditional surfaces, which have extended to cement truck barrels, silk installations, printed vinyl banners, nail foils, clothing and furniture. The work exists at the gritty and sometimes beautiful intersection of toxicity and nature found in urban landscapes. Veils and pools of color reference imagery ranging from gasoline puddles and grease stains to sunsets and snow cones.

Andrew Zarou

Andrew Zarou

The next installation will be Andrew Zarou​, on view September 17 through October 6, 2015​. Zarou, a visual artist and Brooklyn native, meticulously mines his environment for inspiration and catalogs arcane found materials. Some examples include: street cleaner bristles, shower curtains, and clementine crates. Each material source eventually finds its way into an aspect of his practice, as he synthesizes the language of modernist abstraction with the commonplace materials of everyday life. Zarou describes his studio practice “as a balancing act between the physical manifestations of his core tendencies (repetition) and the spontaneous impulse for change (difference).” He includes numerous references to aspects of his personal life, such as dyslexia and music. He compares his process to the feeling of disorientation (i.e. scrambling and omitting words or letters, misspelling,mispronunciation, along with increased heart rate and body temperature).

For the Stephen and George Laundry Line, Zarou is presenting hand cut vinyl pieces which are based on a series of algorithmic drawings that have a simple set of rules of alignment and allocation. Alongside are sculptural pieces made of collected whittled twigs. These are constructed in an improvised asymmetrical form to reference play and composition. Andrew Zarou has exhibited in institutions and galleries nationally including, the Brooklyn Public Library, and MoMA P.S. 1.

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